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Heirloom Vegetable Seeds 

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                      Kale Italian Nero-Toscanna org

This Italian heirloom is also known as Dinosaur Kale, Black Tuscan Kale, Black Cabbage, and Black Palm. A hearty, nutritious kale with vigorous dark green to black leaves, it traditionally is used to add rustic flavor to soups, stews, but also blends wonderfully in grain dishes. Try sautéed in olive oil with garlic and tossed with pasta. Delizioso! If you plant it in the spring, you can harvest the first shoots as tender young salad greens and achieve full-sized plants in two months. But, you must also try growing it in fall, because a little kiss from a fall frost only makes it sweeter! Plants may over winter in mild climates. Rich in nutrients such as Vitamin A, C, K, calcium, folic acid, and powerful anti-oxidants. Intense nutrition to fuel the passionate gardener! See recipe inside packet for Tuscan Kale Pesto.

When to plant outside: Early spring when soil temperatures are at least 60 degrees for a late spring/summer crop, in late summer for a fall crop, or (in USDA zone 7 or warmer) you can sow in fall for a winter or very early spring crop. Seed can also be sown in successive plantings every 3 weeks starting in early spring.

 

   
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  Lettuce Leaf Salad Bowl Blend Organic

Lettuce Leaf - Salad Bowl Blend

Heirloom Seed -organic

 

Burgundy green and red leaves. Beautiful. Most heat resistant lettuce , does not get bitter

   
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Lettuce Mesclun Q Melody Organic

This exquisite organic mix of mesclun greens was chosen by Chef John Platt, owner of Q’s restaurant in Boulder, Colorado. He cooks some of the best food in Boulder (and in the world for that matter)! That is why we trusted him to choose this salad mix. You will be very impressed by the mixture of flavors, textures, and colors that are as varied as the acclaimed cuisine of Q’s restaurant. Chef Platt recommends harvesting this mix as baby greens, shearing off the leaves to 1” above ground when they are 4” to 6” tall. However, you can also harvest mature plants up to 10” tall or pick individual leaves anytime. The earlier the harvest, the more tender the leaves. Plants that are cut no shorter than 2” above ground level will also re-grow new leaves. An excellent container variety, you can grow this gourmet mix just about anywhere that receives at least a half day of sunlight. When to start outside: RECOMMENDED. Early spring, 3 to 4 weeks before average last frost, and successive plantings thereafter every 3 weeks until 2 weeks before the first fall frost. (Skip very hot summers.) USDA zone 8 or warmer: sow in fall for winter harvest. When to start inside: Not recommended. (Since lettuce mixes are often grown for baby leaves, it’s easier to sow directly outdoors rather than trying to grow individual plants inside and transplanting.) Special Sowing & Germination Instructions: Barely cover seed with soil or plant no deeper than 1/8”. Light and cool temperatures increase germination. When thinning lettuce, use the thinnings in salads. It can be planted in rows, but group plantings take up less space and are attractive. Double or triple rows also work

   
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Lettuce -Romaine Parris Island

Certified Organic

Named for Parris Island off the coast of South Carolina, this old favorite Romaine deserves a try by any lettuce lover. “Crunchy leaves”, “creamy white heart”, and “vigorous” are just a few of the words that describe this variety. A mosaic virus tolerant heirloom, it grows with upright, dark green slightly savoyed (crinkled) leaves that reach 8”-12” tall.

When to start outside: RECOMMENDED. Early spring, 3 to 4 weeks before average last frost, and successive plantings thereafter every 3 weeks until 2 weeks before the first fall frost. (Skip very hot summers.) USDA zone 8 or warmer: sow in fall for winter harvest.

When to start inside: Not recommended. (Since lettuce mixes are often grown for baby leaves, it’s easier to sow directly outdoors rather than trying to grow individual plants inside and transplanting.)

 

   
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Lettuce -Butterhead Tom Thumb

Heirloom

Tom Thumb, a miniature English heirloom butterhead, is the perfect size for individual salads. Its petite 4"-5" loose heads can be grown in containers, window boxes, or even as an edible border along a path or flower bed. The sweet, tender heads with buttery flavor are a gourmet treat any way you serve them. You can harvest individual leaves as the plant grows, cut the entire plant off at ground level, or twist out the small interior head to make a lettuce 'bowl' that can be filled with your favorite salad ingredients. (Butterhead type lettuce is rarely bitter, quick maturing, and they are also known as Boston or Bibb lettuce.) This packet plants: Seven 10-foot rows or seven successive plantings of 10-foot rows.

 When to plant outside: Early spring, 3 to 4 weeks before the average last frost, and successive plantings thereafter every 3 weeks until 2 weeks before the first fall frost. In USDA zone 8 or warmer, it can also be sown in fall for winter harvest. When to start inside: 6 weeks before last spring frost and in summer when soil temperatures are too warm outside to germinate lettuce seed. Special Sowing & Germination Instructions: when thinning lettuce, use the thinnings in salads. It can be planted in rows, but group plantings take up less space and are attractive. Double or triple rows also work.

   
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Lettuce -Butterhead  Speckles

Heirloom

 

sow in early spring through fall

 

unusual specklingof these tender leaves will add a beautiful touch to your salad

 When to plant outside: Early spring, 3 to 4 weeks before the average last frost, and successive plantings thereafter every 3 weeks until 2 weeks before the first fall frost. In USDA zone 8 or warmer, it can also be sown in fall for winter harvest. When to start inside: 6 weeks before last spring frost and in summer when soil temperatures are too warm outside to germinate lettuce seed. Special Sowing & Germination Instructions: when thinning lettuce, use the thinnings in salads. It can be planted in rows, but group plantings take up less space and are attractive. Double or triple rows also work.

   
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Lettuce -Romaine

Heirloom

Sow in early Spring- very pretty with freckles!

 When to plant outside: Early spring, 3 to 4 weeks before the average last frost, and successive plantings thereafter every 3 weeks until 2 weeks before the first fall frost. In USDA zone 8 or warmer, it can also be sown in fall for winter harvest. When to start inside: 6 weeks before last spring frost and in summer when soil temperatures are too warm outside to germinate lettuce seed. Special Sowing & Germination Instructions: when thinning lettuce, use the thinnings in salads. It can be planted in rows, but group plantings take up less space and are attractive. Double or triple rows also work.

   
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